The U.S. Post Office is billions in deficit and can not pay its bills. If it were a real company, they would have cut back years ago, consolidated and probably sold itself to a legitimate firm.

Instead, they really think we care if they go to five days a week delivery, fewer distribution centers or it takes a couple extra days to deliver the junk mail.

Bill are on line, invitations to parties are done by Evite, online.  Want to send a letter?  Email.

“The Postal Service claims it has experienced a 25 percent decline in first-class mail volume since 2006. First-class has been the cash cow for the quasi-governmental company, which gets no tax dollars for its operations, relying instead on the sale of postage, postal products and services.

It predicts that with the consolidations and the firing of employees, it will save “almost $2.1 billion annually and ensure the long-term affordability of mail.”

Let me see if I understand it.  The PO deficit is $8 billion or more every year.  All they are doing is saving $2.1 billion—sounds like really incompetent management—but then again, this is government, what would you expect?

The Post Office is as outdated as the buggy whip—but much more expensive.

 

 

 

 

Postal Service cancels some careers in Central Valley

Central Valley Business Times, 2/24/12

•  Cutting jobs in Modesto, Bakersfield and Stockton

•  Part of nationwide consolidation
The U.S. Postal Service says its mind is made up and it plans to entirely or partially close 223 mail processing facilities throughout the country, including three in the Central Valley.

The Postal Service has entered into a contract with CBRE to sell any and all postal-owned properties involved in the closings.

In the Central Valley, the Bakersfield processing and distribution facility will be closed and operations moved to Santa Clarita near Los Angeles. The Modesto customer service and mail processing center will be shuttered and its tasks move to a facility in West Sacramento. The Stockton processing and distribution facility will see its functions transferred to West Sacramento.

Citing regulatory and labor-agreement requirements, the Postal Service is beginning the notification process now in order to be in a position to begin implementing its national realignment during the summer and fall. These changes are contingent upon a final decision to change service standards for first-class mail.

No consolidation of any postal facility will occur prior to May 15 to give Congress and the Administration the opportunity to enact an alternative plan, the Postal Service says..

The Postal Service claims it has experienced a 25 percent decline in first-class mail volume since 2006. First-class has been the cash cow for the quasi-governmental company, which gets no tax dollars for its operations, relying instead on the sale of postage, postal products and services.

It predicts that with the consolidations and the firing of employees, it will save “almost $2.1 billion annually and ensure the long-term affordability of mail.”

More cuts are coming, with the Postal Service pushing to drop Saturday mail service. It says it must slash its operating costs by $20 billion in the next three years.

 

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