Local government needs to pinch every penny, since most are insolvent or close to insolvency.

Sacramento Legislative Democrats wants to pay back the unions that bought them seats in the Capitol.

“Since Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 829 last week, some have questioned what the state legislation means for San Diego’s Prop A, the Fair and Open Competition in Construction Ordinance, which will go before voters in June.

SB 829 states that if a charter city, like San Diego, “prohibits, limits, or constrains in any way the governing board’s authority or discretion to adopt, require or utilize a project labor agreement (PLA)” for city projects, then state funding cannot be used for city projects.

Prop A says the city cannot require a PLA for its projects. “

PLA’s are expensive payoffs to unions.  They are paid for by the families and businesses, while the politicians make out like bandits getting ”donations”  from the unions.

PLA’s are payoffs, should be illegal.  What do you think?  Can you city afford paying 15-25% MORE for a project to payoff a greedy union?

 

What does state PLA legislation mean for Prop A?

   

 

Written by Emily Holding, San Diego News Room, 5/1/12

 
Since Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 829 last week, some have questioned what the state legislation means for San Diego’s Prop A, the Fair and Open Competition in Construction Ordinance, which will go before voters in June.

SB 829 states that if a charter city, like San Diego, “prohibits, limits, or constrains in any way the governing board’s authority or discretion to adopt, require or utilize a project labor agreement (PLA)” for city projects, then state funding cannot be used for city projects.

Prop A says the city cannot require a PLA for its projects.

What does SB 829 mean for Prop A?

According to Bill Baber, director of government affairs for the Associated Builders and Contractors Inc., the state law doesn’t affect Prop A at all.

“SB 829 is the state’s reaction to what Prop A is,” Baber said. “It doesn’t change what Prop A does. It literally has no legal impact on how Prop A is interpreted or implemented or how it’s put into the code.”

But Mike Madrid of Stop Prop A says there is no point in pursuing Prop A in light of SB 829. In fact, he says they will probably ask for Prop A to be withdrawn.

“It’s certainly not going to in any way, shape or form achieve the object of what the proponents originally were trying to do,” said Madrid. “The only thing it can do is put the tax payers and the city coffers in serious jeopardy. The language is unmistakable—if Prop A passes, the city will lose hundreds of millions of dollars in infrastructure funding.”

Baber explained that Prop A is not really a “PLA ban” because it simply says the city council cannot mandate a PLA. It would still allow PLAs for federal, state and private projects.

“What the governor signed is the state’s reaction to Prop A,” Baber said, “meaning the state is concerned that its union friends in San Diego won’t be able to maintain control of their city council, and this is the state legislature trying to protect their political allies in San Diego.”

Baber does not think the state legislation will keep voters from approving Prop A.

“I think San Diego voters are way too smart for that,” he said. “They see it as just more Sacramento game playing. Why do you think they rushed through a gut and amend law 10 days before the absentee ballots go out? Could it have anything to do with politics? I think people can see what’s going on here.”

The main reason Baber said he is not worried about SB 829 is because it is unconstitutional, and he does not think it will hold up in court.

“Fundamentally, for the state to attempt to treat a charter city like this, it’s never been done in the history of California, and the one time it was tried, the courts threw it out,” he said.

Madrid said he does not take issue with the city not using PLAs—opponents of Prop A are just trying to allow the city to retain the option.

“If the city of San Diego doesn’t want to use a PLA on a specific project, that’s fine,” Madrid said. “But what we do object to is the Council tying the hands of future councils indefinitely.”

With the signing of SB829, Madrid says Prop A would cost the city hundreds of millions of dollars in infrastructure funding.

“What the state’s now said is if you’re going to discriminate against a group of workers or limit your financial options, you have that right, but the taxpayers of the state do not have to be complicit in that.”

 

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